NASA's annual budget is half a penny on your tax dollar. Imagine what we could do with a full penny. Penny4NASA.org
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
 
“To provide for research into problems of flight within and outside the earth’s atmosphere, and for other purposes.” - National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958On July 29th, 1958 — ten months after Sputnik 1 was launched into orbit — President Eisenhower signed the National Aeronautics and Space Act. Beginning operations later that year, NASA entered the highly competitive Space Race against the Soviet Union. Culminating with the success of Apollo, the economic benefits and technological advances during NASA’s first decade were immediately felt. Since 1958, twelve astronauts have walked on the Moon, four rovers and four landers have touched down on the Martian soil, and most recently, Voyager I became the first man-made object to enter interstellar space. Perhaps the greatest achievement of this agency, however, has been the success of the International Space Station. Astronauts from various space agencies across the planet have been living and studying aboard the ISS since 2000. NASA has had a rich history, but an even more promising future awaits.Today, on the anniversary of the National Aeronautics and Space Act, join us by writing Congress to express the importance of raising the minuscule NASA budget to a level that will ensure a strong future for all humanity.Sign the petition, spread the word:www.penny4nasa.org/take-actionRead the National Aeronautics and Space Act:http://history.nasa.gov/spaceact.html
 
“To provide for research into problems of flight within and outside the earth’s atmosphere, and for other purposes.” - National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958

On July 29th, 1958 — ten months after Sputnik 1 was launched into orbit — President Eisenhower signed the National Aeronautics and Space Act. Beginning operations later that year, NASA entered the highly competitive Space Race against the Soviet Union. Culminating with the success of Apollo, the economic benefits and technological advances during NASA’s first decade were immediately felt. Since 1958, twelve astronauts have walked on the Moon, four rovers and four landers have touched down on the Martian soil, and most recently, Voyager I became the first man-made object to enter interstellar space. Perhaps the greatest achievement of this agency, however, has been the success of the International Space Station. Astronauts from various space agencies across the planet have been living and studying aboard the ISS since 2000. NASA has had a rich history, but an even more promising future awaits.

Today, on the anniversary of the National Aeronautics and Space Act, join us by writing Congress to express the importance of raising the minuscule NASA budget to a level that will ensure a strong future for all humanity.

Sign the petition, spread the word:
www.penny4nasa.org/take-action

Read the National Aeronautics and Space Act:
http://history.nasa.gov/spaceact.html
On July 24, 1969, the crew of Apollo 11 splashed down in the Pacific Ocean, accomplishing President Kennedy’s goal of “landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth” before the end of the decade.Learn more about Apollo 11 and NASA’s Next Giant Leap here: http://www.nasa.gov/apollo45/Tell Congress it’s time to take the next giant leap for mankind: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

On July 24, 1969, the crew of Apollo 11 splashed down in the Pacific Ocean, accomplishing President Kennedy’s goal of “landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth” before the end of the decade.

Learn more about Apollo 11 and NASA’s Next Giant Leap here: http://www.nasa.gov/apollo45/

Tell Congress it’s time to take the next giant leap for mankind: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

On July 14th, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) released the most detailed map of Mars to date. The USGS compiled data from four orbiting spacecraft over the course of more than 16 years to make the map, which, according to researchers working with the project, should add significantly to our understanding of the Red Planet.
The four spacecraft used in making the map include three NASA spacecraft—Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter—as well as the European Space Agency’s Mars Express Probe. Among the many insights that the map provides is the fact that the Martian surface is older than scientists previously believed; according to researchers, three times as much surface area formed during the Early Noachian Epoch—the first major geologic time period—than previously thought. This period is characterized by a high rate of meteorite impacts, the likely presence of water, and widespread erosion, and it lasted from about 4.1 to 3.7 billion years ago. Researchers also say that this new map could provide valuable information about possible future landing sites on the Martian surface.

Read more here: http://www.space.com/26521-best-mars-geology-map-video.html
With a Penny4NASA, we will learn even more about the Red Planet and usher in a new era of exploration! Take action: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

 

On July 14th, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) released the most detailed map of Mars to date. The USGS compiled data from four orbiting spacecraft over the course of more than 16 years to make the map, which, according to researchers working with the project, should add significantly to our understanding of the Red Planet.

The four spacecraft used in making the map include three NASA spacecraft—Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter—as well as the European Space Agency’s Mars Express Probe. Among the many insights that the map provides is the fact that the Martian surface is older than scientists previously believed; according to researchers, three times as much surface area formed during the Early Noachian Epoch—the first major geologic time period—than previously thought. This period is characterized by a high rate of meteorite impacts, the likely presence of water, and widespread erosion, and it lasted from about 4.1 to 3.7 billion years ago. Researchers also say that this new map could provide valuable information about possible future landing sites on the Martian surface.

Read more here: http://www.space.com/26521-best-mars-geology-map-video.html

With a Penny4NASA, we will learn even more about the Red Planet and usher in a new era of exploration! Take action: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

 

After completing 200 orbits of the Earth for nearly thirteen days, Atlantis made its 33rd — and final — landing on July 21st, 2011, as STS-135 was the final mission of the Space Shuttle program. For thirty years, a generation of astronauts embarked on a wide range of dynamic missions utilizing the five shuttles that comprised the Space Transportation System (STS). As humanity’s first reusable spacecraft, these robust shuttles provided the means for two of NASA’s finest achievements — launching the Hubble Space Telescope and constructing the International Space Station. "The space shuttle changed the way we view the world, the way we view the universe," STS-135 Commander Chris Ferguson said soon after landing. "America’s not going to stop exploring. Thanks for protecting us and bringing this program to a fitting end."Since the completion of STS-135 three years ago, NASA still remains unable to send Americans to space, and must rely upon the Russian Space Agency, Roscosmos for passage to the ISS. Hoping that an American-based commercial alternative would be available by 2015 under the Commercial Crew Program (CCP), NASA had an original contract with Roscosmos at roughly $62.7 million per seat aboard a Soyuz spacecraft. However, because of the failure on Congress’ part to fully fund the CCP at optimum levels, that goal was made impossible. Still requiring a means to transport Americans to and from the ISS, on April 30th, 2013, NASA was forced to extend that contract until 2017. This extension also comes at a price. The price of one Soyuz seat now requires NASA to pay Roscosmos approximately $8 million more, at $70.7 million/seat. Tell Congress that you support fully funding the Commercial Crew Program and that you want to end NASA’s dependence on expensive Soyuz trips: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/ 
"End of an Era: The Final Shuttle Launch" was the sixth episode of The Sagan Series. It can be viewed here: http://goo.gl/RxRJxD 
Sources:1. STS-135 Landing Bloghttp://goo.gl/OUYT52. NASA to Pay $70 Million a Seat to Fly Astronauts on Soyuzhttp://goo.gl/bQKAY

After completing 200 orbits of the Earth for nearly thirteen days, Atlantis made its 33rd — and final — landing on July 21st, 2011, as STS-135 was the final mission of the Space Shuttle program. For thirty years, a generation of astronauts embarked on a wide range of dynamic missions utilizing the five shuttles that comprised the Space Transportation System (STS). As humanity’s first reusable spacecraft, these robust shuttles provided the means for two of NASA’s finest achievements — launching the Hubble Space Telescope and constructing the International Space Station. 

"The space shuttle changed the way we view the world, the way we view the universe," STS-135 Commander Chris Ferguson said soon after landing. "America’s not going to stop exploring. Thanks for protecting us and bringing this program to a fitting end."

Since the completion of STS-135 three years ago, NASA still remains unable to send Americans to space, and must rely upon the Russian Space Agency, Roscosmos for passage to the ISS. Hoping that an American-based commercial alternative would be available by 2015 under the Commercial Crew Program (CCP), NASA had an original contract with Roscosmos at roughly $62.7 million per seat aboard a Soyuz spacecraft. However, because of the failure on Congress’ part to fully fund the CCP at optimum levels, that goal was made impossible. Still requiring a means to transport Americans to and from the ISS, on April 30th, 2013, NASA was forced to extend that contract until 2017. 

This extension also comes at a price. The price of one Soyuz seat now requires NASA to pay Roscosmos approximately $8 million more, at $70.7 million/seat. Tell Congress that you support fully funding the Commercial Crew Program and that you want to end NASA’s dependence on expensive Soyuz trips: 

http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/ 

"End of an Era: The Final Shuttle Launch" was the sixth episode of The Sagan Series. It can be viewed here: http://goo.gl/RxRJxD 

Sources:
1. STS-135 Landing Blog
http://goo.gl/OUYT5
2. NASA to Pay $70 Million a Seat to Fly Astronauts on Soyuz
http://goo.gl/bQKAY

“It’s been a long way, but we’re here.” - NASA Astronaut Alan Shepard While NASA has been sending American astronauts into space for over half a century, it all began with one - Alan Bartlett Shepard, Jr. An American test pilot, Shepard was selected as one of the first seven astronauts by the then newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Coined the ‘Mercury 7’, NASA’s first batch of carefully selected and trained individuals were to pilot the manned spaceflights of the Mercury program. In January 1961, Alan Shepard was selected from this group to pilot the Freedom 7 mission which would make him not only the first American in space, but the first human to reach this threshold. Unfortunately, due to delays by unplanned preparatory work, the flight was postponed nearly seven months after the initial planned date. In this time, more specifically less than a month prior to Shepard’s flight, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin would leapfrog Shepard to become the first person in space and to orbit the Earth. On May 5, 1961, Shepard piloted the Freedom 7 mission and became the second person, and the first American, to travel into space.Following his involvement with Mercury and Gemini, Shepard would command America’s third successful lunar landing mission - Apollo 14. The first mission to successfully broadcast color television pictures from the surface of the Moon, Shepard piloted the Lunar Module Antares to the most accurate landing of the entire Apollo program.On July 21st 1998, at the age of 74, Alan Shepard succumbed to leukemia.Celebrate the career of Alan Shepard by writing to Congress to let them know you support doubling funding for NASA: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/
To read more:http://goo.gl/QnZ6tjhttp://goo.gl/aaqsrvhttp://goo.gl/EIn4Iq

It’s been a long way, but we’re here.” - NASA Astronaut Alan Shepard 

While NASA has been sending American astronauts into space for over half a century, it all began with one - Alan Bartlett Shepard, Jr. An American test pilot, Shepard was selected as one of the first seven astronauts by the then newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Coined the ‘Mercury 7’, NASA’s first batch of carefully selected and trained individuals were to pilot the manned spaceflights of the Mercury program. In January 1961, Alan Shepard was selected from this group to pilot the Freedom 7 mission which would make him not only the first American in space, but the first human to reach this threshold. 

Unfortunately, due to delays by unplanned preparatory work, the flight was postponed nearly seven months after the initial planned date. In this time, more specifically less than a month prior to Shepard’s flight, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin would leapfrog Shepard to become the first person in space and to orbit the Earth. On May 5, 1961, Shepard piloted the Freedom 7 mission and became the second person, and the first American, to travel into space.

Following his involvement with Mercury and Gemini, Shepard would command America’s third successful lunar landing mission - Apollo 14. The first mission to successfully broadcast color television pictures from the surface of the Moon, Shepard piloted the Lunar Module Antares to the most accurate landing of the entire Apollo program.

On July 21st 1998, at the age of 74, Alan Shepard succumbed to leukemia.

Celebrate the career of Alan Shepard by writing to Congress to let them know you support doubling funding for NASA: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

To read more:
http://goo.gl/QnZ6tj
http://goo.gl/aaqsrv
http://goo.gl/EIn4Iq

While today may belong to the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing, it’s important not to forget another important anniversary for NASA - the landing of the Viking 1 spacecraft on Mars!On July 20th, 1976, the Viking 1 lander separated from the orbiter and touched down at Chryse Planitia, a flat lowland region in the northern hemisphere of Mars. Immediately following touchdown, the lander made history by taking and transmitting the first complete photograph taken from the surface of Mars. The image (http://goo.gl/6C5L6m) was of the Viking 1 lander’s foot as an indication of how far it had sunk into the Martian surface. Between itself and its companion, Viking 2, this historic photograph was just the first of more than 50,000 images taken from the Martian surface, as well as from orbit, and transmitted back to Earth.What makes Viking 1 especially worth noting is that it was not only the first attempt by the United States at landing on Mars, but it was also the first spacecraft to successfully do so and perform its mission. While the Soviet Mars 3 mission was the first to achieve a soft landing of a spacecraft on Mars it stopped transmitting data 15 seconds after landing. During those few seconds of transmission, it sent the first partial photograph taken from the surface of Mars although nothing was identifiable in it.During its operation on the Martian surface, Viking 1 became the record holder for longest Mars surface mission at 2307 days, until Mars Rover Opportunity took the record in 2010.To read more about Viking 1:http://goo.gl/NOxjpMhttp://goo.gl/iKPlJ6http://goo.gl/6klaq9

While today may belong to the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing, it’s important not to forget another important anniversary for NASA - the landing of the Viking 1 spacecraft on Mars!

On July 20th, 1976, the Viking 1 lander separated from the orbiter and touched down at Chryse Planitia, a flat lowland region in the northern hemisphere of Mars. Immediately following touchdown, the lander made history by taking and transmitting the first complete photograph taken from the surface of Mars. The image (http://goo.gl/6C5L6m) was of the Viking 1 lander’s foot as an indication of how far it had sunk into the Martian surface. Between itself and its companion, Viking 2, this historic photograph was just the first of more than 50,000 images taken from the Martian surface, as well as from orbit, and transmitted back to Earth.

What makes Viking 1 especially worth noting is that it was not only the first attempt by the United States at landing on Mars, but it was also the first spacecraft to successfully do so and perform its mission. While the Soviet Mars 3 mission was the first to achieve a soft landing of a spacecraft on Mars it stopped transmitting data 15 seconds after landing. During those few seconds of transmission, it sent the first partial photograph taken from the surface of Mars although nothing was identifiable in it.

During its operation on the Martian surface, Viking 1 became the record holder for longest Mars surface mission at 2307 days, until Mars Rover Opportunity took the record in 2010.

To read more about Viking 1:
http://goo.gl/NOxjpM
http://goo.gl/iKPlJ6
http://goo.gl/6klaq9

The phrase “Tough and Competent” was created by NASA Flight Director Gene Kranz and became the rallying cry of NASA and the Mission Control crew after the Apollo 1 disaster. "Spaceflight will never tolerate carelessness, incapacity, and neglect. Somewhere, somehow, we screwed up. It could have been in design, build, or test. Whatever it was, we should have caught it. We were too gung ho about the schedule and we locked out all of the problems we saw each day in our work. Every element of the program was in trouble and so were we. The simulators were not working, Mission Control was behind in virtually every area, and the flight and test procedures changed daily. Nothing we did had any shelf life. Not one of us stood up and said, ‘Dammit, stop!’ I don’t know what Thompson’s committee will find as the cause, but I know what I find. We are the cause! We were not ready! We did not do our job. We were rolling the dice, hoping that things would come together by launch day, when in our hearts we knew it would take a miracle. We were pushing the schedule and betting that the Cape would slip before we did. From this day forward, Flight Control will be known by two words: ‘Tough’ and ‘Competent.’ Tough means we are forever accountable for what we do or what we fail to do. We will never again compromise our responsibilities. Every time we walk into Mission Control we will know what we stand for. Competent means we will never take anything for granted. We will never be found short in our knowledge and in our skills. Mission Control will be perfect. When you leave this meeting today you will go to your office and the first thing you will do there is to write ‘Tough and Competent’ on your blackboards. It will never be erased. Each day when you enter the room these words will remind you of the price paid by Grissom, White, and Chaffee. These words are the price of admission to the ranks of Mission Control." - The Kranz Dictum Gene Kranz served as Flight Director for a number of NASA milestones, including Apollo 11, the “successful failure” of Apollo 13, and the repair of the Hubble Space Telescope in 1994. Please be sure to checkout another great video from our friend Mike Dawson and his Assignment Universe project.Watch “Gene Kranz - Mission Control: Tough & Competent” here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5536WCe_Z_w

The phrase “Tough and Competent” was created by NASA Flight Director Gene Kranz and became the rallying cry of NASA and the Mission Control crew after the Apollo 1 disaster. 

"Spaceflight will never tolerate carelessness, incapacity, and neglect. Somewhere, somehow, we screwed up. It could have been in design, build, or test. Whatever it was, we should have caught it. We were too gung ho about the schedule and we locked out all of the problems we saw each day in our work. Every element of the program was in trouble and so were we. The simulators were not working, Mission Control was behind in virtually every area, and the flight and test procedures changed daily. Nothing we did had any shelf life. Not one of us stood up and said, ‘Dammit, stop!’ I don’t know what Thompson’s committee will find as the cause, but I know what I find. We are the cause! We were not ready! We did not do our job. We were rolling the dice, hoping that things would come together by launch day, when in our hearts we knew it would take a miracle. We were pushing the schedule and betting that the Cape would slip before we did. From this day forward, Flight Control will be known by two words: ‘Tough’ and ‘Competent.’ Tough means we are forever accountable for what we do or what we fail to do. We will never again compromise our responsibilities. Every time we walk into Mission Control we will know what we stand for. Competent means we will never take anything for granted. We will never be found short in our knowledge and in our skills. Mission Control will be perfect. When you leave this meeting today you will go to your office and the first thing you will do there is to write ‘Tough and Competent’ on your blackboards. It will never be erased. Each day when you enter the room these words will remind you of the price paid by Grissom, White, and Chaffee. These words are the price of admission to the ranks of Mission Control." - The Kranz Dictum 

Gene Kranz served as Flight Director for a number of NASA milestones, including Apollo 11, the “successful failure” of Apollo 13, and the repair of the Hubble Space Telescope in 1994. Please be sure to checkout another great video from our friend Mike Dawson and his Assignment Universe project.

Watch “Gene Kranz - Mission Control: Tough & Competent” here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5536WCe_Z_w