NASA's annual budget is half a penny on your tax dollar. Imagine what we could do with a full penny. Penny4NASA.org
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/

UPDATE: NASA has confirmed that the MAVEN spacecraft has completed its engine burn to enter orbit around Mars.

WATCH LIVE: NASA’s TV coverage of MAVEN’s arrival at Mars http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

NASA’s latest Mars mission will arrive at the Red Planet this Sunday after traveling 442 million miles during its 10-month journey. The spacecraft will study Mars from orbit in the hopes of answering the question: If Mars once had an atmosphere capable of sustaining liquid water at its surface, what happened to it?

The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft, or MAVEN for short, is NASA’s latest mission to study the Red Planet. It’s the first spacecraft sent specifically to study Mars’ upper atmosphere. It’s job is to examine the composition, structure and escape of gases in the upper atmosphere of Mars, and to study how it interacts with the solar wind.

“So far, so good with the performance of the spacecraft and payloads on the cruise to Mars,” according to MAVEN project manager David Mitchell, of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “The team, the flight system, and all ground assets are ready for Mars orbit insertion.”

The spacecraft is expected to begin orbital insertion at approximately 9:50 p.m. EDT Sunday, when it will fire its engines for 33 minutes to maneuver the spacecraft into a 35-hour elliptical orbit around Mars. The spacecraft will later be moved into a 4.5-hour science orbit.

MAVEN will then embark on a one year prime mission with the aim of improving our understanding of what happened to the Martian atmosphere and the water that was once present on the surface of Mars. “These are important questions for understanding the history of Mars, its climate, and its potential to support at least microbial life,” said MAVEN principal investigator Bruce Jakosky, of the University of Colorado, Boulder’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics.

Read more about NASA’s latest mission to the Red Planet here.
http://www.penny4nasa.org/2014/09/19/nasas-maven-spacecraft-arrives-at-mars/

UPDATE: Congratulations to SpaceX on a successful launch of their CRS-4 mission to the International Space Station.
SpaceX’s Cargo Resupply Mission Set To Launch At 1:52 A.M. ET Carrying A 3D Printer To The ISS. Watch LIVE: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv3D printing technology and its expansion is believed by some to be the trigger for a forthcoming second industrial revolution. For companies like SpaceX, NASA, and additive manufacturing company Made In Space, the future of this type of manufacturing is believed to serve an instrumental purpose far beyond the bounds of our planet. Today, 3D printing will begin its journey into space for the very first time.After nearly 30,000 hours of 3D printing technology testing, and 400-plus parabolas of airborne microgravity test flights with help from NASA, Made In Space’s microwave-sized 3D printer, called Portal, is flying aboard SpaceX’s next Dragon resupply mission to the International Space Station (ISS).As Made in Space maintains, manufacturing the necessary tools and assets in-house (as opposed to launching them from Earth), will not only accelerate space development, but will broaden and expand the industry as well.“Cargo ships just can’t go make a quick run to deliver you something that you’ve run out of,” said LaNetra Tate, the principal investigator for Advanced Manufacturing at NASA Headquarters. This is especially significant when considering space exploration beyond the confines of low-Earth orbit. 3D printing is a technology, which Tate asserts, “that can be potentially beneficial for exploring deeper into space.”SpaceX’s Dragon commercial resupply mission launches from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Sunday, September 21th at 1:52 AM ET.To read more about this story:http://goo.gl/OeIIquhttp://goo.gl/55MJvIhttp://goo.gl/P1mueQShow your support for NASA by writing to Congress to let them know you support doubling funding for NASA: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

UPDATE: Congratulations to SpaceX on a successful launch of their CRS-4 mission to the International Space Station.

SpaceX’s Cargo Resupply Mission Set To Launch At 1:52 A.M. ET Carrying A 3D Printer To The ISS. Watch LIVE: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv

3D printing technology and its expansion is believed by some to be the trigger for a forthcoming second industrial revolution. For companies like SpaceX, NASA, and additive manufacturing company Made In Space, the future of this type of manufacturing is believed to serve an instrumental purpose far beyond the bounds of our planet. Today, 3D printing will begin its journey into space for the very first time.

After nearly 30,000 hours of 3D printing technology testing, and 400-plus parabolas of airborne microgravity test flights with help from NASA, Made In Space’s microwave-sized 3D printer, called Portal, is flying aboard SpaceX’s next Dragon resupply mission to the International Space Station (ISS).

As Made in Space maintains, manufacturing the necessary tools and assets in-house (as opposed to launching them from Earth), will not only accelerate space development, but will broaden and expand the industry as well.

“Cargo ships just can’t go make a quick run to deliver you something that you’ve run out of,” said LaNetra Tate, the principal investigator for Advanced Manufacturing at NASA Headquarters. This is especially significant when considering space exploration beyond the confines of low-Earth orbit. 3D printing is a technology, which Tate asserts, “that can be potentially beneficial for exploring deeper into space.”

SpaceX’s Dragon commercial resupply mission launches from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Sunday, September 21th at 1:52 AM ET.

To read more about this story:
http://goo.gl/OeIIqu
http://goo.gl/55MJvI
http://goo.gl/P1mueQ

Show your support for NASA by writing to Congress to let them know you support doubling funding for NASA: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

Happy Software Freedom Day! Find Out How NASA Has Contributed To Open Source Software:“Back in 2008 and 2009, people were still trying to figure out what ‘cloud’ meant. While lots of people were calling themselves ‘cloud enabled’ or ‘cloud ready,’ there were few real commercial offerings. With so little clarity on the issue, there was an opportunity for us to help fill that vacuum.” - Raymond O’Brien, +NASA Ames Research Center  Needing a way to standardize web space, a team of researchers at NASA Ames began a 2008 project known as NASA.net. The project offered a way to consolidate web development tools and data resources which heightened efficiency between all facets of the space agency. William Eshagh, another key contributor from NASA.net’s early days, aimed to find a way for web developers to upload code to a platform that was universally utilized.“The basic idea was that the web developer would write their code and upload it to the website, and the website would take care of everything else,” according to Eshagh.Still requiring an “infrastructure service” to manage the large quantities of data that NASA accumulates on a daily basis, the scope of the Ames project switched gears, and NASA.net was reorganized as Nebula. Rather than simply setting standards and providing a platform for web developers, the Nebula team would construct an open source compute controller. Early on, the collaborative nature of Nebula benefited development — as anyone with the understanding of the technology and desire could access the code and provide improvements. Raymond O’Brien, who remained on the Nebula team, reiterated the appeal of Nebula’s open source identity.“From the beginning, we wanted this project to involve a very large community—private enterprises, academic institutions, research labs—that would take Nebula and bring it to the next level. It was a dream, a vision. It was that way from the start,” said O’Brien.An early obstacle the pure open sourced project had to overcome was a piece of software known as the cloud controller, a pivotal segment of the project if the end users are to access computers or data. At this time, the existing tools were either written in the incorrect programming language or were closed source — not usable due to licensing limitations. However, It only took the Nebula team a matter of days to build a new cloud controller from scratch, and immediately began to attract interest from Rackspace Inc.“We believed we were addressing a general problem that would have broad interest,” stated Eshagh. “As it turns out, that prediction couldn’t have been more accurate.”Rackspace, known for providing open source storage, was set to begin construction of a similar cloud controller to what Nebula just released. Given the technical similarities between the two teams, Rackspace and Nebula began a partnership known as OpenStack — and a community of developers around the world would contribute towards the construction of what would become one of the most successful open source cloud operating systems.The future of OpenStack, and other open source projects, are bright due the early efforts of the NASA.net team at Ames. Due to the initial devotion to keeping the project open source in those early days, a large majority of contributions to the OpenStack code came from community efforts outside of NASA. Today, on Software Freedom Day, be sure to checkout the following resources related to the OpenStack cloud, a NASA Spinoff.Sources:1. Web Solutions Inspire Cloud Computing Softwarehttp://spinoff.nasa.gov/Spinoff2012/it_2.html2. Nebula, NASA, and OpenStackhttp://open.nasa.gov/blog/2012/06/04/nebula-nasa-and-openstack/3. Software Freedom Dayhttp://softwarefreedomday.org/

Happy Software Freedom Day! Find Out How NASA Has Contributed To Open Source Software:

“Back in 2008 and 2009, people were still trying to figure out what ‘cloud’ meant. While lots of people were calling themselves ‘cloud enabled’ or ‘cloud ready,’ there were few real commercial offerings. With so little clarity on the issue, there was an opportunity for us to help fill that vacuum.” - Raymond O’Brien, +NASA Ames Research Center 

Needing a way to standardize web space, a team of researchers at NASA Ames began a 2008 project known as NASA.net. The project offered a way to consolidate web development tools and data resources which heightened efficiency between all facets of the space agency. William Eshagh, another key contributor from NASA.net’s early days, aimed to find a way for web developers to upload code to a platform that was universally utilized.

“The basic idea was that the web developer would write their code and upload it to the website, and the website would take care of everything else,” according to Eshagh.

Still requiring an “infrastructure service” to manage the large quantities of data that NASA accumulates on a daily basis, the scope of the Ames project switched gears, and NASA.net was reorganized as Nebula. Rather than simply setting standards and providing a platform for web developers, the Nebula team would construct an open source compute controller. Early on, the collaborative nature of Nebula benefited development — as anyone with the understanding of the technology and desire could access the code and provide improvements. Raymond O’Brien, who remained on the Nebula team, reiterated the appeal of Nebula’s open source identity.

“From the beginning, we wanted this project to involve a very large community—private enterprises, academic institutions, research labs—that would take Nebula and bring it to the next level. It was a dream, a vision. It was that way from the start,” said O’Brien.

An early obstacle the pure open sourced project had to overcome was a piece of software known as the cloud controller, a pivotal segment of the project if the end users are to access computers or data. At this time, the existing tools were either written in the incorrect programming language or were closed source — not usable due to licensing limitations. However, It only took the Nebula team a matter of days to build a new cloud controller from scratch, and immediately began to attract interest from Rackspace Inc.

“We believed we were addressing a general problem that would have broad interest,” stated Eshagh. “As it turns out, that prediction couldn’t have been more accurate.”

Rackspace, known for providing open source storage, was set to begin construction of a similar cloud controller to what Nebula just released. Given the technical similarities between the two teams, Rackspace and Nebula began a partnership known as OpenStack — and a community of developers around the world would contribute towards the construction of what would become one of the most successful open source cloud operating systems.

The future of OpenStack, and other open source projects, are bright due the early efforts of the NASA.net team at Ames. Due to the initial devotion to keeping the project open source in those early days, a large majority of contributions to the OpenStack code came from community efforts outside of NASA. Today, on Software Freedom Day, be sure to checkout the following resources related to the OpenStack cloud, a NASA Spinoff.

Sources:
1. Web Solutions Inspire Cloud Computing Software
http://spinoff.nasa.gov/Spinoff2012/it_2.html
2. Nebula, NASA, and OpenStack
http://open.nasa.gov/blog/2012/06/04/nebula-nasa-and-openstack/
3. Software Freedom Day
http://softwarefreedomday.org/

NASA’s MAVEN Spacecraft Arrives At Mars This Weekend
NASA’s latest Mars mission will arrive at the Red Planet this Sunday after traveling 442 million miles during its 10-month journey. The spacecraft will study Mars from orbit in the hopes of answering the question: If Mars once had an atmosphere capable of sustaining liquid water at its surface, what happened to it?
The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft, or MAVEN for short, is NASA’s latest mission to study the Red Planet. It’s the first spacecraft sent specifically to study upper atmosphere of Mars. It’s job is to examine the composition, structure and escape of gases in the upper atmosphere of Mars, and to study how it interacts with the solar wind.
“So far, so good with the performance of the spacecraft and payloads on the cruise to Mars,” according to MAVEN project manager David Mitchell, of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “The team, the flight system, and all ground assets are ready for Mars orbit insertion.”
The spacecraft is expected to begin orbital insertion at approximately 9:50 p.m. EDT Sunday, when it will fire its engines for 33 minutes to maneuver the spacecraft into a 35-hour elliptical orbit around Mars. The spacecraft will later be moved into a 4.5-hour science orbit.
Read more: http://www.penny4nasa.org/2014/09/19/nasas-maven-spacecraft-arrives-at-mars/

NASA’s MAVEN Spacecraft Arrives At Mars This Weekend

NASA’s latest Mars mission will arrive at the Red Planet this Sunday after traveling 442 million miles during its 10-month journey. The spacecraft will study Mars from orbit in the hopes of answering the question: If Mars once had an atmosphere capable of sustaining liquid water at its surface, what happened to it?

The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft, or MAVEN for short, is NASA’s latest mission to study the Red Planet. It’s the first spacecraft sent specifically to study upper atmosphere of Mars. It’s job is to examine the composition, structure and escape of gases in the upper atmosphere of Mars, and to study how it interacts with the solar wind.

“So far, so good with the performance of the spacecraft and payloads on the cruise to Mars,” according to MAVEN project manager David Mitchell, of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “The team, the flight system, and all ground assets are ready for Mars orbit insertion.”

The spacecraft is expected to begin orbital insertion at approximately 9:50 p.m. EDT Sunday, when it will fire its engines for 33 minutes to maneuver the spacecraft into a 35-hour elliptical orbit around Mars. The spacecraft will later be moved into a 4.5-hour science orbit.

Read more: http://www.penny4nasa.org/2014/09/19/nasas-maven-spacecraft-arrives-at-mars/

“You develop an instant global consciousness, a people orientation, an intense dissatisfaction with the state of the world, and a compulsion to do something about it.” - Apollo 14 Lunar Module Pilot, Edgar MitchellOne of twelve astronauts to have walked on the lunar surface, Edgar Dean Mitchell’s early development as a member of the astronaut corps began as as product of the famed Astronaut Group 5. As was the case with many Apollo era astronauts, Mitchell initially served as a member of the astronaut support crew (for the Apollo 9 mission) before serving as backup Lunar Module Pilot for Apollo 10.It wasn’t until January 1971 that Mitchell would join Alan Shepard and Stuart Roosa as the Lunar Module Pilot for NASA’s 8th manned Apollo mission, Apollo 14. Over the course of the 9-day mission, the crew would conduct rigorous fieldwork including collecting nearly 100 pounds of lunar rock samples for return to Earth. At the time, the crew would also set records for longest lunar surface stay time (33 hours), longest lunar surface EVA (9.25 hours), and largest payload returned from the lunar surface. Not only would Mitchell become the 6th astronaut to walk on the lunar surface during this period, but he would log a total of 216 hours and 42 minutes in space.Penny4NASA wishes Apollo 14 Lunar Module Pilot Edgar Mitchell, the last surviving member of the Apollo 14 crew, a very happy 84th birthday!Take a look at Space Advocates’ ‘The Spirit of Apollo’ video, and consider what raising the NASA budget from less than half a penny up to one full penny on each federal dollar spent can and will do for our economy, for our society, and for our future: http://goo.gl/kUDM7To read more about Edgar Mitchell:http://goo.gl/Bild4xhttp://goo.gl/H9VEiXShow your support for NASA by writing to Congress to let them know you support doubling funding for NASA: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

You develop an instant global consciousness, a people orientation, an intense dissatisfaction with the state of the world, and a compulsion to do something about it.” - Apollo 14 Lunar Module Pilot, Edgar Mitchell

One of twelve astronauts to have walked on the lunar surface, Edgar Dean Mitchell’s early development as a member of the astronaut corps began as as product of the famed Astronaut Group 5. As was the case with many Apollo era astronauts, Mitchell initially served as a member of the astronaut support crew (for the Apollo 9 mission) before serving as backup Lunar Module Pilot for Apollo 10.

It wasn’t until January 1971 that Mitchell would join Alan Shepard and Stuart Roosa as the Lunar Module Pilot for NASA’s 8th manned Apollo mission, Apollo 14. Over the course of the 9-day mission, the crew would conduct rigorous fieldwork including collecting nearly 100 pounds of lunar rock samples for return to Earth. At the time, the crew would also set records for longest lunar surface stay time (33 hours), longest lunar surface EVA (9.25 hours), and largest payload returned from the lunar surface. Not only would Mitchell become the 6th astronaut to walk on the lunar surface during this period, but he would log a total of 216 hours and 42 minutes in space.

Penny4NASA wishes Apollo 14 Lunar Module Pilot Edgar Mitchell, the last surviving member of the Apollo 14 crew, a very happy 84th birthday!

Take a look at Space Advocates’ ‘The Spirit of Apollo’ video, and consider what raising the NASA budget from less than half a penny up to one full penny on each federal dollar spent can and will do for our economy, for our society, and for our future: http://goo.gl/kUDM7

To read more about Edgar Mitchell:
http://goo.gl/Bild4x
http://goo.gl/H9VEiX

Show your support for NASA by writing to Congress to let them know you support doubling funding for NASA: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

"Houston, this is Apollo 10. You can tell the world we have arrived." - Apollo 10 Commander, Thomas P. StaffordVery few have had the opportunity to travel into space in their lifetime. Even fewer can say that they’ve done so as part of four separate missions.Thomas P. Stafford’s career as an astronaut spans nearly a decade, including involvement with the Gemini (Gemini 6A, Gemini 9A) Apollo (Apollo 10), and Apollo-Soyuz (ASTP) programs. However, perhaps Stafford’s greatest role during his career would be as Commander of the final, full-scale lunar landing dress rehearsal, Apollo 10.Launched two months prior to the liftoff of Apollo 11, Apollo 10’s function was one of great weight, and would prove decisive in safely putting astronauts on the lunar surface. As an F type mission, this particular Apollo flight was meant as a dress rehearsal for the Apollo 11 mission, testing each and every procedure for the Moon landing (including undocking the lunar module from the command module) without actually landing on the Moon itself. This included running a simulated decent to just 15km above the lunar surface.As the first spacecraft to carry a colour television camera, Apollo 10 was also the first to broadcast live colour TV transmissions of the lunar surface and of the Earth from afar. As a result of the footage attained, the crew was awarded a special Emmy award.Penny4NASA wishes Commander Thomas Stafford a very happy 84th birthday!To read more about Thomas Stafford:http://goo.gl/1EE3MeTo read more about astronauts Thomas Stafford, Eugene Cernan, John Young, and the Apollo 10 mission: http://goo.gl/wQSOJHTake a look at Space Advocates’ video, the Spirit of Apollo, and consider what raising the NASA budget from less than half a penny up to one full penny on each federal dollar spent can and will do for our economy, for our society and for our future: http://goo.gl/kUDM7Celebrate Thomas Stafford’s 84th birthday by writing to Congress to let them know you support doubling funding for NASA: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

"Houston, this is Apollo 10. You can tell the world we have arrived." - Apollo 10 Commander, Thomas P. Stafford

Very few have had the opportunity to travel into space in their lifetime. Even fewer can say that they’ve done so as part of four separate missions.

Thomas P. Stafford’s career as an astronaut spans nearly a decade, including involvement with the Gemini (Gemini 6A, Gemini 9A) Apollo (Apollo 10), and Apollo-Soyuz (ASTP) programs. However, perhaps Stafford’s greatest role during his career would be as Commander of the final, full-scale lunar landing dress rehearsal, Apollo 10.

Launched two months prior to the liftoff of Apollo 11, Apollo 10’s function was one of great weight, and would prove decisive in safely putting astronauts on the lunar surface. As an F type mission, this particular Apollo flight was meant as a dress rehearsal for the Apollo 11 mission, testing each and every procedure for the Moon landing (including undocking the lunar module from the command module) without actually landing on the Moon itself. This included running a simulated decent to just 15km above the lunar surface.

As the first spacecraft to carry a colour television camera, Apollo 10 was also the first to broadcast live colour TV transmissions of the lunar surface and of the Earth from afar. As a result of the footage attained, the crew was awarded a special Emmy award.

Penny4NASA wishes Commander Thomas Stafford a very happy 84th birthday!

To read more about Thomas Stafford:
http://goo.gl/1EE3Me

To read more about astronauts Thomas Stafford, Eugene Cernan, John Young, and the Apollo 10 mission: http://goo.gl/wQSOJH

Take a look at Space Advocates’ video, the Spirit of Apollo, and consider what raising the NASA budget from less than half a penny up to one full penny on each federal dollar spent can and will do for our economy, for our society and for our future: http://goo.gl/kUDM7

Celebrate Thomas Stafford’s 84th birthday by writing to Congress to let them know you support doubling funding for NASA: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/