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WATCH LIVE: Orionid Meteor Shower Peaks TonightAn annual meteor shower is set to peak tonight providing skywatchers with an ideal opportunity to see a “falling star.”The Orionid meteor shower, deriving its name from the constellation Orion that the meteors appear to come from, occurs every year for approximately a week in late October. The prolific meteor shower is created from the debris coming off of Halley’s comet, which enters Earth’s atmosphere creating what appear to be “falling stars.”You should be able to see up to 20 meteors per hour in the early morning hours on Tuesday. No telescope is required to view the meteor shower. NASA will be providing a webcast of the Orionid meteor shower starting at 10 p.m. EDT on Oct. 20 for those who are unable to view it due to poor weather or light pollution.[Read more: Light Pollution And NASA: Combating The “Dark Side” Of Light]

WATCH LIVE: Orionid Meteor Shower Peaks Tonight

An annual meteor shower is set to peak tonight providing skywatchers with an ideal opportunity to see a “falling star.”

The Orionid meteor shower, deriving its name from the constellation Orion that the meteors appear to come from, occurs every year for approximately a week in late October. The prolific meteor shower is created from the debris coming off of Halley’s comet, which enters Earth’s atmosphere creating what appear to be “falling stars.”

You should be able to see up to 20 meteors per hour in the early morning hours on Tuesday. No telescope is required to view the meteor shower. NASA will be providing a webcast of the Orionid meteor shower starting at 10 p.m. EDT on Oct. 20 for those who are unable to view it due to poor weather or light pollution.

[Read more: Light Pollution And NASA: Combating The “Dark Side” Of Light]

NASA: All Mars Orbiters In Good Health Following Comet Flyby

NASA has reported that all three of the agency’s Mars orbiters are in good health following Comet Siding Spring’s close flyby of the Red Planet earlier today.

While none of the spacecrafts were ever in danger of colliding with the comet’s core, the orbiters were maneuvered in order to limit the threat posed by dust particles from the comet’s tail traveling at high velocity.

Read more: http://www.penny4nasa.org/2014/10/19/nasa-all-mars-orbiters-in-good-health-following-comet-flyby/

WATCH LIVE: Comet Siding Spring Makes Its Closest Approach To Mars http://www.penny4nasa.org/2014/10/18/watch-webcasts-of-comet-siding-spring-flyby-of-mars/

Comet C/2013 A1, also known as Siding Spring, named after the observatory that first spotted the comet, was discovered last year by astronomer Robert McNaught. Comet Siding Spring will make its closest approach to Mars on Oct. 19 at 2:27 p.m. EDT when the comet will pass by Mars at a distance of only 87,000 miles, less than half the distance between Earth and the moon.

Read more: http://www.penny4nasa.org/2014/10/18/comet-siding-spring-mars-flyby/

Comet Siding Spring Set To Flyby Mars In Once In A Lifetime EventIn a once in a million years event, a comet is expected to buzz by Mars in a cosmic close encounter.Comet C/2013 A1, also known as Siding Spring, named after the observatory that first spotted the comet, was discovered last year by astronomer Robert McNaught. Comet Siding Spring will make its closest approach to Mars on Oct. 19 at 2:27 p.m. EDT when the comet will pass by Mars at a distance of only 87,000 miles, less than half the distance between Earth and the moon.“On Oct. 19, we’re going to observe an event that happens maybe once every million years,” director of NASA’s planetary science division, Jim Green, said in a press conference earlier this month. “This is an absolutely spectacular event.”[WATCH LIVE: Webcast Of Comet Siding Spring’s Flyby Of Mars]This will be the comet’s first trip through the inner solar system. The comet comes from the Oort Cloud, a distant region of our solar system composed of icy bodies thought to be remnants left over from the formation of our solar system. Comet Siding Spring will be the first Oort Cloud comet to be studied up-close by spacecraft, presenting a rare opportunity to uncover clues about the conditions that existed during the formation of our solar system.“This particular comet has never before entered the inner solar system, so it will provide a fresh source of clues to our solar system’s earliest days,” John Grunsfeld, astronaut and associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington said in a statement.Read more: http://www.penny4nasa.org/2014/10/18/comet-siding-spring-mars-flyby/

Comet Siding Spring Set To Flyby Mars In Once In A Lifetime Event

In a once in a million years event, a comet is expected to buzz by Mars in a cosmic close encounter.

Comet C/2013 A1, also known as Siding Spring, named after the observatory that first spotted the comet, was discovered last year by astronomer Robert McNaught. Comet Siding Spring will make its closest approach to Mars on Oct. 19 at 2:27 p.m. EDT when the comet will pass by Mars at a distance of only 87,000 miles, less than half the distance between Earth and the moon.

“On Oct. 19, we’re going to observe an event that happens maybe once every million years,” director of NASA’s planetary science division, Jim Green, said in a press conference earlier this month. “This is an absolutely spectacular event.”

[WATCH LIVE: Webcast Of Comet Siding Spring’s Flyby Of Mars]

This will be the comet’s first trip through the inner solar system. The comet comes from the Oort Cloud, a distant region of our solar system composed of icy bodies thought to be remnants left over from the formation of our solar system. Comet Siding Spring will be the first Oort Cloud comet to be studied up-close by spacecraft, presenting a rare opportunity to uncover clues about the conditions that existed during the formation of our solar system.

“This particular comet has never before entered the inner solar system, so it will provide a fresh source of clues to our solar system’s earliest days,” John Grunsfeld, astronaut and associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington said in a statement.

Read more: http://www.penny4nasa.org/2014/10/18/comet-siding-spring-mars-flyby/

Following the success of their previous Kickstarter in November, Chop Shop, a graphic design company specializing in sci-fi and science themes, is asking for support of a new campaign promoting historic robotic spaceflight missions. This campaign will conclude on November 12th, and includes The Planetary Society as partners.Read more about the Historic Robotic Spacecraft Poster Series on our latest blog post: http://www.penny4nasa.org/2014/10/16/historic-robotic-spacecraft-poster-series/

Following the success of their previous Kickstarter in November, Chop Shop, a graphic design company specializing in sci-fi and science themes, is asking for support of a new campaign promoting historic robotic spaceflight missions. This campaign will conclude on November 12th, and includes The Planetary Society as partners.

Read more about the Historic Robotic Spacecraft Poster Series on our latest blog post: 
http://www.penny4nasa.org/2014/10/16/historic-robotic-spacecraft-poster-series/

NASA Spots Three New Targets For New Horizons Pluto MissionNASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has identified three new targets for the agency’s New Horizons probe to explore after it arrives in the Pluto system next year.The three Kuiper Belt objects were discovered by the New Horizons team who were granted use of the Hubble Space Telescope to search for other bodies that the spacecraft could study. KBOs are particularly difficult to discover because they are very small, dim and distant objects.“We started to get worried that we could not find anything suitable, even with Hubble, but in the end the space telescope came to the rescue,” said New Horizons science team member John Spencer of Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. “There was a huge sigh of relief when we found suitable KBOs; we are ‘over the moon’ about this detection.” Read more: http://www.penny4nasa.org/2014/10/15/nasa-spots-new-targets-for-new-horizons-pluto-mission/

NASA Spots Three New Targets For New Horizons Pluto Mission

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has identified three new targets for the agency’s New Horizons probe to explore after it arrives in the Pluto system next year.

The three Kuiper Belt objects were discovered by the New Horizons team who were granted use of the Hubble Space Telescope to search for other bodies that the spacecraft could study. KBOs are particularly difficult to discover because they are very small, dim and distant objects.

“We started to get worried that we could not find anything suitable, even with Hubble, but in the end the space telescope came to the rescue,” said New Horizons science team member John Spencer of Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. “There was a huge sigh of relief when we found suitable KBOs; we are ‘over the moon’ about this detection.”

Read more: http://www.penny4nasa.org/2014/10/15/nasa-spots-new-targets-for-new-horizons-pluto-mission/

NASA Captures Spooky ‘Jack-O-Lantern’ Image Of The SunWith Halloween looming just around the corner, NASA has captured a spooky image of our sun sporting what looks like the creepy grin of a jack-o’-lantern.The photo is actually composite of images captured in two different wavelengths by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory on Oct. 8. The photo combines images of the sun in two different ultraviolet wavelengths — 171 and 193 angstroms — typically colored yellow and gold, giving the appearance of a jack-o’-lantern.Read more: http://www.penny4nasa.org/2014/10/13/nasa-captures-spooky-jack-o-lantern-image-of-the-sun/

NASA Captures Spooky ‘Jack-O-Lantern’ Image Of The Sun

With Halloween looming just around the corner, NASA has captured a spooky image of our sun sporting what looks like the creepy grin of a jack-o’-lantern.

The photo is actually composite of images captured in two different wavelengths by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory on Oct. 8. The photo combines images of the sun in two different ultraviolet wavelengths — 171 and 193 angstroms — typically colored yellow and gold, giving the appearance of a jack-o’-lantern.

Read more: http://www.penny4nasa.org/2014/10/13/nasa-captures-spooky-jack-o-lantern-image-of-the-sun/

“On October 19th, we’re going to observe an event that happens maybe once every million years.” – Dr. Jim Green, director of NASA’s planetary science divisionNASA is gearing up for the opportunity of a lifetime, one that could yield new information about the conditions that shaped our solar system and the atmosphere on Mars. In just one week, Comet Siding Spring, also known as C/2013 A1, will make its first trip through the inner solar system and pass within 87,000 miles (139,500 kilometers) of the Martian surface—approximately one-third the distance between Earth and the moon. Siding Spring gets its name from Australia’s Siding Spring Observatory, where astronomer Rob McNaught discovered the comet in 2013. Since Siding Spring comes from the Oort Cloud (and this happens to be the comet’s first “heat-treatment”), it is likely that the comet remains largely unchanged since its formation nearly 4.6 billion years ago. This creates an opportunity for scientists to study the composition and behavior of an object very similar to those that filled the early solar system, which could provide further clues about the conditions that existed when the solar system first formed. NASA’s Mars orbiters and rovers are preparing to study both the comet and its effect on Mars’ atmosphere. By studying how the comet interacts with the Red Planet’s air, scientists hope to gain a better understanding of the Martian atmosphere, in addition to data about the comet itself. The image below shows the Mars rovers and orbiters—including the newly arrived MAVEN spacecraft—that NASA is planning to utilize in studying Comet Siding Spring. Read more:http://www.space.com/27395-mars-comet-flyby-nasa-spacecraft.htmlhttp://cometcampaign.org/Take action: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/

“On October 19th, we’re going to observe an event that happens maybe once every million years.” – Dr. Jim Green, director of NASA’s planetary science division

NASA is gearing up for the opportunity of a lifetime, one that could yield new information about the conditions that shaped our solar system and the atmosphere on Mars. In just one week, Comet Siding Spring, also known as C/2013 A1, will make its first trip through the inner solar system and pass within 87,000 miles (139,500 kilometers) of the Martian surface—approximately one-third the distance between Earth and the moon. 

Siding Spring gets its name from Australia’s Siding Spring Observatory, where astronomer Rob McNaught discovered the comet in 2013. Since Siding Spring comes from the Oort Cloud (and this happens to be the comet’s first “heat-treatment”), it is likely that the comet remains largely unchanged since its formation nearly 4.6 billion years ago. This creates an opportunity for scientists to study the composition and behavior of an object very similar to those that filled the early solar system, which could provide further clues about the conditions that existed when the solar system first formed. 

NASA’s Mars orbiters and rovers are preparing to study both the comet and its effect on Mars’ atmosphere. By studying how the comet interacts with the Red Planet’s air, scientists hope to gain a better understanding of the Martian atmosphere, in addition to data about the comet itself. 

The image below shows the Mars rovers and orbiters—including the newly arrived MAVEN spacecraft—that NASA is planning to utilize in studying Comet Siding Spring. 

Read more:
http://www.space.com/27395-mars-comet-flyby-nasa-spacecraft.html
http://cometcampaign.org/

Take action: http://www.penny4nasa.org/take-action/