"NASA’s annual budget is half a penny on your tax dollar. For twice that—a penny on a dollar—we can transform the country" - Neil deGrasse Tyson. Find out more and Take Action at Penny4NASA.org
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Obviously, it wasn’t armageddon, seeing that we’re all still here.

But what does it mean for the future of the Earth if there’s a chance we may not be able to detect asteroids before it’s too late?

Asteroid 2014 AA was discovered by scientists with the Catalina Sky Survey in Tucson, Arizona, early on January 1st, as it slammed harmlessly into Earth’s atmosphere just after the New Year began.

NASA officials wrote in a press release that the most likely impact location of the object was just off the coast of West Africa at about 6 p.m. PST (9 p.m. EST) on New Year’s Day.

Because it was just 7 to 10 feet (2 to 3 meters) across or so, asteroid 2014 AA probably broke up during atmospheric entry.

To date, more than 10,000 near-Earth asteroids such as 2014 AA have been discovered, but the total population of these space rocks is thought to number in the millions.

And should they slam into the Earth, some of the big ones have the potential to do extensive damage to our home planet.

Take action. Tell Congress that we need NASA and that *they* need double funding.

http://penny4nasa.org/take-action

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/04/asteroid-2014-aa_n_4541073.html

Obviously, it wasn’t armageddon, seeing that we’re all still here.

But what does it mean for the future of the Earth if there’s a chance we may not be able to detect asteroids before it’s too late?

Asteroid 2014 AA was discovered by scientists with the Catalina Sky Survey in Tucson, Arizona, early on January 1st, as it slammed harmlessly into Earth’s atmosphere just after the New Year began.

NASA officials wrote in a press release that the most likely impact location of the object was just off the coast of West Africa at about 6 p.m. PST (9 p.m. EST) on New Year’s Day.

Because it was just 7 to 10 feet (2 to 3 meters) across or so, asteroid 2014 AA probably broke up during atmospheric entry.

To date, more than 10,000 near-Earth asteroids such as 2014 AA have been discovered, but the total population of these space rocks is thought to number in the millions.

And should they slam into the Earth, some of the big ones have the potential to do extensive damage to our home planet.

Take action. Tell Congress that we need NASA and that *they* need double funding.

http://penny4nasa.org/take-action

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/04/asteroid-2014-aa_n_4541073.html

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